Facts

Contact person:
Tomas Peterson
Financers:
  • Centrum för Idrottsforskning
  • SASUF
Responsible at Malmö University:
Tomas Peterson
Project members:
Collaborators:
  • Halmstad Högskola
  • Lunds universitet
  • The University of Western Cape
  • Cape Peninsula University of Technology
Time frame:
01 October 2019 - 31 December 2020
Faculty/department:

About the project

This is a sociological research project, studying children attending a secondary school with a physical activity profile. Such school forms have become popular both among youngsters and local politicians in Sweden. Since a few years, there is also a secondary school with a physical activity profile in Malmö, “Malmö idrottsgrundskola”.

Although the motives for starting these schools are not always clear, two goals are often mentioned:

  • to foster elite athletes
  • to promote an active lifestyle

Yet very few of the pupils will become elite athletes. And it is not known whether pupils from this school form will take part in competitive or recreational sports in adulthood to a greater extent than their peers at ordinary schools. MYSS (Malmö Youth Sport Study) is a longitudinal study.

Two basic questions to be answered are, firstly, if this school form contributes to a larger extent to foster elite athletes, and, secondly, if this school form contributes to pupils taking part in competitive or recreational sports in adulthood to a greater extent than their peers at ordinary schools.

The overall aim

The overall aim with the MYSS study is both to answer these two questions empirically, and to investigate which selection factors (gender-related, physiological, social, or psychological) could be used to explain the outcomes. This research project constitutes the sociological part of MYSS.

Participants

All children born in two cohorts attending the “Malmö idrottsgrundskola”. Baseline data, as well as a three years- and a six years follow up has been collected.

Since 2018 an international corporation is developing between MYSS, the University of Western Cape and the Cape Peninsula Technological University.

The research is based on comparisons between the sport school in Malmö and the Western Cape Sport School, where the sport activities by and large are the same, but the societal conditions are as different as they can possibly be.