Programme, bachelor’s level
180 credits
Malmö | daytime | 100%
28 August, 2023 - 7 June, 2026
Full tuition fee: 290000 SEK
Apply by 16 January
Apply now

About the education

This programme provides you with further knowledge and a deeper understanding of Europe and the European Union today and historically, including its position and role from the global perspective. You will be introduced to a variety of disciplines and perspectives on Europe, with a combination of theories and insights from the fields of political science, history, geography, law, culture, and literature. The programme will prepare you for a career in regional and national administrations, EU institutions, or elsewhere in private, public and NGO sectors. It also provides a solid foundation for further master’s level studies.

Until recently, our generation was the first in hundreds of years to grow up in a Europe without war. That changed in 2022 when Russia invaded Ukraine, and Europe is now facing new threats and challenges. At the same time, the early 21st century has seen divisions and constellations challenging the accepted European order of the last 60 years. By participating in the European studies bachelor’s programme, you will gain knowledge and understanding of the continent's complex and diverse politics, societies and cultures, from past to present.

The programme combines perspectives, theories, and issues from the fields of political science, history, geography, law, culture, and literature studies. Europe is complex and it plays an increasingly important role in our lives. To fully understand the continent and the EU, more than one national or scientific perspective is required. This three-year bachelor's programme provides you with a multidisciplinary approach to Europe in an international setting.

Through an interdisciplinary approach, you will gain knowledge and awareness of issues related to politics, society and culture on a larger scale. 

The first year focuses on introducing Europe as a field of study and investigating the political governance and emergence of the EU as a leading European and global player. Students will also explore artistic expressions from the Enlightenment until the early 21st century that have been important for shaping our understanding of Europe. The second year will focus on deepening their knowledge and understanding gained from the first year, presenting research fields and preparing to write a minor thesis. The final year explores theoretical, philosophical, and methodological issues and perspectives, ending with the students consolidating their studies through research and completing their final thesis. 

During the second and third years, the programme also offers elective semesters where you have the opportunity to choose from an internship, exchange studies, or elective courses such as global politics, climate change, project management and migration studies.

The programme is designed to offer students a real insight into European mobility, together with historical perspectives and knowledge on how Europe and the EU function. The education aims to give students a general competence and understanding of Europe from a historical and critical perspective, beyond the present-day EU and individual national perspectives. The courses combine humanities with social science, providing an understanding of the continent, its changes and diversities. Students will thus develop a practical and comprehensive competence that prepares them to face future challenges in Europe.

During the programme, you will work actively in the courses and in your research, cooperating with actors both inside and outside the academic world; locally, regionally, nationally and on a wider European level.

The academic approach closely connects to current events in the European sphere. Teaching methods include lectures, group work, simulations, debates, theme studies, and self-study of literature.

During the second and third years, you will have the opportunity to study abroad and/or do an internship, which will offer you practical experience outside the traditional classroom setting. Malmö University cooperates with many universities to provide our students exchange opportunities.

This programme is ideal for those seeking to start or advance a career in regional and national administrations, various EU institutions, or elsewhere in the private, public and NGO sectors seeking to employ people with knowledge and understanding of the European institutions, politics, and societies. The programme also provides a solid foundation for further master’s level studies.

Entry requirements and selection

Entry requirements

General entry requirements + Civics 1b or Civics 1a1 +1a2, English 6

Selection

Upper secondary grades 66%, Swedish Scholastic Aptitude Test (SweSAT) 34%

Looking beyond the headlines

There has never been a more interesting time to study Europe, agree programme coordinators Derek Hutcheson and Inge Eriksson. They have devised and developed the new bachelor’s degree, giving the subject historical context, and political relevance to arm graduates with deep-rooted knowledge that...

Looking beyond the headlines

There has never been a more interesting time to study Europe, agree programme coordinators Derek Hutcheson and Inge Eriksson. They have devised and developed the new bachelor’s degree, giving the subject historical context, and political relevance to arm graduates with deep-rooted knowledge that will help them understand future European challenges. “Never a day goes by when you don’t switch on the television and see something which in some way impacts on or has been impacted by the EU,” said Derek.

Looking beyond the headlines

“The key point is that students will learn to look beyond the headlines and day to day events, and start to interconnect causal links between one event and another. These events might appear different on the surface, but once you look at the chain of events which led to each of them, you can start to understand what the connections are,” he added.

The programme combines different disciplinary approaches to give students a broad understanding of European culture, history and identity.

The benefits of historical context

“If you do not understand the past and the power of political memory, then you will get lost in the conflict line. The programme gives students tools to act within institutions, because politics is connected to memory, to different backgrounds and different political cultures.

“Sometimes there is a focus only on the formalities of institutions, but in negotiations, for example, you need to have an understanding of other aspects of whom you are negotiating with,” said Inge.

Derek concentrates on the political science elements of the programme, whereas Inge tackles Europe’s historical context.

"At times it is necessary to go back as far as the mid-17th Century and the Westphalian period, which saw the formation of nation states and the change from fragmented sovereignty to a modern concept of sovereignty. This gives a better understanding of what is going on in Europe today," explained Inge.

“All these things fit together; you cannot understand what is unique about the EU until you can understand that up until 70 years ago, European states frequently went to war which eachother, and the EU’s ancestors — the European Coal and Steel Community and European Economic Community — were major attempts to pool sovereignty together and build institutions above the level of individual states,” said Derek.

As political and trade borders have become increasingly blurred, one focus of the programme is on the Öresund Region, which effectively demonstrates how an economic hub can be created between two countries.

The ever-changing Europe

“In the Europe of the past, there were boundaries, borders, and passport controls. Over time, it has become easier to move across the continent and at the same time there are different links over borders. This region is a good example; you have Sweden and Denmark and an infrastructure — the bridge — linking the two together. So increasingly, the state boundary between Denmark and Sweden is not a factor, but what is important is that there are common economic and cultural interests on each side of the water. And across Europe you can see similar things happening,” said Derek.

“For the study of regionalisation, we are perfectly situated to use this example as a case study. As well as our location in the region, we also have great academic links to regional and local government and other organisations,” added Inge.

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