Programme, bachelor’s level
180 credits
Malmö daytime 100%
30 August, 2021 - 2 June, 2024
Full tuition fee: 235000 SEK
Apply by 15 April
Apply now
Other place or pace of study
Malmö daytime 100%
30 August, 2021 - 2 June, 2024
Full tuition fee: 235000 SEK
Open for late application
Apply now
The programme has given me a basis for understanding how and why people move. We study migration theories, citizenship and how these issues relate to identity.

Keenan Allen, alumni

 

About the education

This programme gives you a solid foundation for a career dealing with migration and diversity-related issues such as asylum law, segregation, discrimination, social cohesion, globalisation and integration, or for further studies at the Master’s level.

Topics include:

  • Global migration and migration policies
  • Refugees and asylum law
  • Integration and segregation
  • Identity and community
  • Racism and nationalism
  • Research methodology and project work
  • Academic writing
  • Managing projects
  • Possibility for field studies
  • Possibility of internship or study abroad

Future employment may be in fields such as administration and social work at local authorities, governmental and non-governmental organisations and in fields such as business and journalism.

Migration, especially its effects on a global scale, has become one of the most fundamental issues concerning societies worldwide. Governments, corporations, politicians and individuals all over the world try to grasp the possibilities and concerns of increasing mobility on a global scale. International Migration and Ethnic Relations at Malmö University addresses these issues. 

Refugees from war-torn regions of the world, people seeking to find jobs and a decent quality of life away from their country of birth, and executives in multinational corporations are all part of migratory movements. This programme studies the effects of migration at a global and national level, on the formation of ethnic communities, religious groups, families, and individuals to find out how policies could facilitate integration and hinder segregation and racism in societies worldwide. It also addresses fundamental issues concerning concepts such as culture and ethnicity.

In the past decades, Malmö has gone through a dramatic change. What until recently was a working class industrial city is now a thriving city, focused on the production of service and knowledge rather than industrial goods. Malmö is also one of the cities in northern Europe with the largest proportion of newly arrived migrants. It is, therefore, an exciting place to study the effects of international migration and ethnic relations, and we collaborate with the surrounding society on these issues. The strong international element of the programme is emphasised by the possibility for students to take an entire semester abroad with one of our partner universities around the world.

Graduates typically get jobs within a wide range of areas such as government and non-government organisations concerned with issues of globalisation, migration, refugees, integration and segregation. Graduates can also find jobs connected to social work, journalism and various businesses concerned with global issues. You can also proceed to studies at advanced level/master's courses and eventually go on to do a PhD.

Admission requirements

Admission requirements

General entry requirements + English B

Merit rating is calculated based on Swedish upper secondary grades achieved, according to specific entry requirement 6/A6.

Selection

Swedish upper secondary grades 66%, Swedish Scholastic Aptitude Test (SweSAT) 34%

Crossing borders

Keenan Allen had many plans. Ending up in the IMER classroom was not one of them. Now, he wants to use his knowledge to be a social entrepreneur, an artist, a researcher, and much more.

Crossing borders

Keenan Allen had many plans. Ending up in the IMER classroom was not one of them. Now, he wants to use his knowledge to be a social entrepreneur, an artist, a researcher, and much more.

A few years ago, Keenan was studying medicine in Tokyo. Today, he is working with refugee children in Malmö.

“When I started studying, I had my heart set on becoming a physician and spent years studying biology and medicine. I found myself overwhelmed and exhausted. I thought I could be more effective working with society rather than the human body.”

Studying at Malmö University

Originally from Chicago, Keenan moved to New Orleans just before hurricane Katrina hit and lead to widespread dislocation. By the time he moved to Sweden, he had personally seen the effects migration and movement firsthand.

 “When I came here I felt that I was ready to finish a degree. I found out about this programme and thought it would serve me very well. It has given me basis for understanding how and why people move. We study migration theories, citizenship and how these issues relate to identity.

“The programme also focuses on ethnic relations, which wasn’t the most appealing part of the programme for me at the start. However, as I'm working in the field, I am realising that the more globalised we become through technology, the more we need to connect in a physical way, face-to-face.”

Working with unaccompanied refugee children

Since finishing his studies at Malmö University, Keenan has been working at a residential care home for unaccompanied refugee children in Malmö.

“In the programme we get to study refugee and asylum law and processes, all of the things I deal with at work. When assisting these people, I understand how the law works and how the EU has designed its framework. The programme is very practical in that sense.”

Passport Carriers

Even before moving to Sweden, Keenan was working on a personal project exploring borders and closed spaces.

“I remember that when I got my passport, that was the first time I started thinking about national identity, and how passports are directly connected to certain kinds of access. I started a project in Chicago called Passport Carriers.

“The project is about mobility and how to include people who are excluded from society. Now, when working with young people, I want to continue my project to inspire them. My ambition is to turn this into a research project in the future.

“I see myself as a cultural activist or cultural entrepreneur involved in social business. It is hard to explain because I want to bounce around and not be in a fixed position. I want to be able to utilise my knowledge in collaboration with others. I really believe in people and people’s capacity to do great things.” 

Seize opportunities, and use your studies to grow

Get hands-on experience, travel and get involved. Sofie Dahl has plenty of recommendations for students interested in studying, and working with, international migration. Just a few years after finishing her studies, she has landed the job she aspired to and has new ambitions to work...

Seize opportunities, and use your studies to grow

Get hands-on experience, travel and get involved. Sofie Dahl has plenty of recommendations for students interested in studying, and working with, international migration. Just a few years after finishing her studies, she has landed the job she aspired to and has new ambitions to work internationally.

After spending time in Vietnam, Hong Kong and Georgia, this Swede is back home. Sofie is now working as an case officer for the Swedish Migration Agency, and would recommend it to everyone who wants to work hands-on with migration issues.

“You never get bored in this kind of profession, there is always a chance to develop, get a career or work internationally.”

Encouraging independence

Sofie uses the social science approach to critical thinking as one example of what she has taken with her from the programme.

 “It is a very applicable thing, critical thinking. To consider yourself and your own role – in how we communicate, act and express ourselves. Being critical of unwritten rules and having an ability to think outside of the old framework is vital.

“This job is challenging in a good way. There is a lot going on and you have to learn and adapt. In addition to working with different parts of the asylum process, I also get to incorporate different fields of responsibilities. In my current position, I am also the contact person for issues involving human trafficking, so there are always new challenges ahead.”

Complemented the education with practical experience

During her time at Malmö University, Sofie took advantage of the study abroad programme and did a semester in Hong Kong. She also did project work in Georgia financed by a scholarship from the Swedish Institute.

“If there is any advice I could have given to myself when I was a student, it would be to take advantage of all the possibilities you have. There are a lot of scholarships, internships and courses available that can give you some great experiences and deepen your knowledge. Seize those opportunities, and use your studies to grow.

“Apart from my time in Hong Kong and Georgia, I also studied in Vietnam for a semester, and did an internship at the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, in Malaysia.  Back in Sweden, I volunteered at the organisations Individuell Människohjälp and the Hunger Project. Getting involved is a great opportunity to learn more."

Contact