Programme, bachelor’s level
180 credits
Malmö daytime 100%
30 August, 2021 - 2 June, 2024
Full tuition fee: 235000 SEK
Open for late application
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The programme has provided me with a greater understanding of social development. As a student, I have gone from being a spectator of society to better understanding human rights and their relation to societal development.

Matilda Andersson, student

About the education

This programme provides you with an understanding and knowledge of what constitutes human rights, how human rights are utilised and how the development of human rights is a result of transformation in the world.

Human rights imply that all people are born free, are of equal value and have equal rights. But what rights prevail, how are they monitored and what happens when they are violated?

After graduation, students will be able to work with legal, political or ethical issues within the sphere of human rights. Students can also continue on to master's studies.

The issue of human rights is constantly relevant. By studying them, their importance, history and implementation, we are provided with the opportunity to fully understand current events in public debates, ranging from migration and children's rights to global crime and criminal law.

In this programme, we take a look at the local and international role of human rights, and their role in public authorities, organisations and businesses. The role of human rights in democracies and oppressive regimes will also be studied.

This three-year bachelor's programme provides you with in-depth knowledge of human rights and how they are applied and affected by the world we live in. This is a multi-disciplinary programme, which focuses on viewing human rights through three perspectives:

Law

What role do human rights play in international law? How have these rights changed from commonly held moral norms to law, and what has happened as a result of this?  

Politics

How are international communities and governments addressing human rights? We will look at this from a sociological and political perspective.

Philosophy

What questions are raised by these rights? Who decides which rights predominate, and what is the significance of having human rights?

During the programme, you can choose to do an internship, study abroad or take elective courses. This provides you with the opportunity to deepen your knowledge and get practical experience in human rights work, as well as the chance to develop relationships and network with people and organisations in the industry.

The diversity of the programme combined with its multidisciplinary focus provides you with competencies attractive in numerous sectors and in a constantly growing labour market. You will be able to work with legal, political and ethical issues, as well as to continue studies at a master’s level.

Future employers may include private sector businesses, local and international organisations and agencies, as well as national authorities and government organisations.

Studying human rights gives you a platform for a career in organisations such as the UN, Amnesty International and the European Union.

 

Admission requirements

Here you can find the admission requirements for the programme. For general admissions enquiries please contact the Admissions Office: admissions@mau.se

Admission requirements

General entry requirements + English B

Merit rating is calculated based on Swedish upper secondary grades achieved, according to specific entry requirement 6/A6.

Selection

Swedish upper secondary grades 66%, Swedish Scholastic Aptitude Test (SweSAT) 34%

Edoardo wants to work with international law

For Edoardo Iacobelli, studying human rights seemed to be a perfect way of making a profession out of his interest in international issues. When the time came to pick a bachelor’s programme, Malmö University seemed to be the perfect fit, located in a genuinely multicultural city.

Edoardo wants to work with international law

For Edoardo Iacobelli, studying human rights seemed to be a perfect way of making a profession out of his interest in international issues. When the time came to pick a bachelor’s programme, Malmö University seemed to be the perfect fit, located in a genuinely multicultural city.

Seeing new perspectives

“Studying human rights is fascinating; we do get the full spectrum of it all. The political and legal, as well as the more philosophical perspective. I have always been very interested in social change, and I want to work with something that has a demonstrable effect on people’s lives. This programme has opened doors for me to do that.

“My ambition has always been to work with politics, and I wanted to study something versatile and substantial, and that’s why I chose this programme. Once I started, it was the legal aspect that caught my interest, and my goal now is to work with international law in combination with my degree in Human Rights. I find that this programme encourages us to work with different spheres within human rights, not just politics.”

Benefits of choosing Malmö

Studying human rights means you have to put in the hours, but it’s not all lectures and homework. One of the advantages of studying in Malmö is that you are very close to the issues at hand. Since moving here, Edoardo has become Chairman of Amnesty’s Malmö section.

“Malmö is a big activist city and there are a lot of organisations to get involved with if you are passionate about human rights. It’s a great place to meet like-minded people interested in humanitarian issues who want to make a difference.”

The programme consists primarily of lectures, seminars and group work, all led by great teachers, says Edoardo.

“If I could give some advice for prospective students it would be to pick the brains of the teachers and soak up as much information as you can. The professors are great, and lecturers are never afraid to have discussions in class. You can tell it’s not just about one-way communication.“

An education that inspires you to take part in society

For Matilda Andersson, moving to a new town and studying full time was not an easy choice to make. “I think a lot of students are hesitant, it’s a bit of a gamble. What I would like to say to them is: just go for it! You won’t regret it for a second.”

An education that inspires you to take part in society

For Matilda Andersson, moving to a new town and studying full time was not an easy choice to make. “I think a lot of students are hesitant, it’s a bit of a gamble. What I would like to say to them is: just go for it! You won’t regret it for a second.”

Choosing Human Rights

Not having studied at university before, Matilda was looking for a broad programme that offered specialisation in a variety of fields. She enjoys that the Human Rights programme provides its students with several perspectives including politics, law and philosophy.

“I have travelled a lot, and that affected my view of society and development and sparked an interest in human rights. The programme has provided me with a greater understanding of social development. As a student, I have gone from being a spectator of society to better understand human rights and their relation to societal development.

“I was attracted by the university's profile. It is a modern university, and I had heard great things. You do get a bit extra out of studying human rights in Malmö — international and social issues are discussed very openly here.

“During the autumn, I helped a movement in town working with refugees, and have since realised the number of organisations in the area focusing on humanitarian and international issues is high. I think that says a lot about this city.”

Open programme structure

Largely consisting of lectures, seminars and group work, the programme also provides students with the opportunity to choose elective courses, or do an internship or exchange studies abroad. Matilda took this opportunity to choose courses focusing on Swedish administrative law.

“It is a broad programme that looks at the concept of human rights from different perspectives. You get the foundation and a deeper insight into the issues. After that, it's up to you what you want to do with it. I want to work locally.

“Everything the programme touches on relates to major global issues, and that’s why you will never regret choosing this programme.”

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